chance

Composition

Composition can be daunting. The good news is you can learn about it and get better with time and practice!

When I’m in the field, I always look for interesting shapes, patterns, lines and texture. Once I find a potential subject, I evaluate the intensity of the light, its direction and the need to use filters or not. I identify distracting elements, determine my focal point and move around to find my composition. I establish the depth of field, what should be in focus and which lens to use. Then I set up my tripod, which is essential in order to get sharp images. After taking my shot, I check the histogram and the clarity of my image on the back screen. From there I can adjust my composition accordingly. I find that seeing my image on the small screen tells me right away if the composition is good or not.

I believe that a poor image cannot be fixed with a software so I prefer to take the time to compose my images while I am in the field. I also prefer to spend my time outside rather than in front of my computer!

If you’re ready to learn how to get better images, sign up for an upcoming workshop or ask for a private workshop.

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Get off Auto, create your best images this summer!

Just added 3 workshops in English and 3 in French, all in the Comox Valley, and on Saturdays afternoon.

  • Learn how to use your camera on manual mode

  • Learn about exposure, depth of field, focus, and key elements of composition

  • Use technical and creative elements together to improve your images

  • Get more confident with your camera and your skills

  • Get more one-on-one time by being part of a small group of 5 participants

  • Take your newly acquired knowledge to your next trip

Book now!

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What wildlife really does when humans are away...

First look around and make sure no-one else is here. And then roll in the moss!

River otter, Lontra canadensis

Element of intention and element of chance

I always go in the field prepared and with intent. However my mind is also open for the unexpected.

One morning, I went to the Oyster River estuary with the intention to photograph ducks. I arrived very early in order to avoid the dog walkers, dogs being a major deterrent to wildlife observation and photography. The fog was starting to dissipate as I quietly entered the woods. Every few steps, I stopped, listened and looked for birds and other wildlife. That’s when I had the chance to spot a heron resting on a branch by the trail. The branch was low, which was perfect for an eye-level shot. I slowly approached the heron from the side, warning him of my presence. I quickly set up my camera and took a series of shots. I didn’t overstay because herons have a low tolerance level towards human presence and I didn’t want to disturb him any longer than necessary.

Heron on a branch, Oyster River

Heron on a branch, Oyster River

On that morning, although my intention was to photograph ducks in the estuary, I had the chance to observe a sleepy heron on a branch and come back with some great images. In nature photography, be prepared for lucky shots!